The End-Point Assessment (EPA) is coming up, and your Healthcare Assistant Practitioner Apprentice is probably preparing as best as they can.

As the Apprentice’s Trainer/Mentor, you’re doing everything you can to make sure they have all the Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours they need.

But there are also loads of extra things you can do to make sure their chances of success are even greater.

In this blog, we’ll offer you some guidance and tips on how to make the EPA a true showcase of your Apprentice’s amazing abilities.

Gateway

Gateway leading to a grassy pasture

Before we get into any of the assessment components, you’ll need to do some checks.

Make sure that your Healthcare Assistant Practitioner Apprentice has completed everything below so that they can proceed on to the EPA.

15 Standards

In order for your Healthcare Assistant Practioner Apprentice to proceed on to EPA, they must meet the 15 standards of care as set out in the Care Certificate.

The Care Certificate is an identified set of standards that health and social care workers adhere to in their daily working life. Meeting this set of standards ensures that all workers have the same Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours to provide safe, compassionate and high-quality support.

By the end of the Formative Study, your Apprentice should be able to demonstrate the following standards:

  • Understand their role;
  • Their personal development;
  • Duty of care;
  • Equality and diversity;
  • Work in a person-centred way;
  • Communication;
  • Privacy and dignity;
  • Fluids and nutrition;
  • Awareness of mental health, dementia and learning disability;
  • Safeguarding adults;
  • Safeguarding children;
  • Basic life support;
  • Health and safety;
  • Handling information;
  • Infection prevention and control.

You can find a full description of the Care Certificate standards here.

Functional Skills

Your Healthcare Assistant Practitioner Apprentice must have received their certificates in Level 2 English and Maths by the Gateway stage to use as evidence for their readiness to undertake EPA.

Level 5 Qualification

As part of their Formative Study, your Apprentice will need to complete a regulated Level 5 occupational competence qualification.

You should keep in mind that your Apprentice needs to have achieved their qualification and received their certificate before Gateway. Keep in contact with your Awarding Organisation to ensure your Apprentice gets their certificate at the agreed time.

Some End-Point Assessment Organisations are also  Awarding Organisations. You can make things simpler by having one organisation performing both functions!

Check with the Apprentice

It’s important for the Apprentice to feel confident in their abilities going into the Healthcare Assistant Practitioner EPA. If they’re a bit nervous about their EPA, here are some tips to help them get into the right mindset.

Learning Journal

Throughout the apprenticeship program, your Apprentice will have kept a Learning Journal to reflect on their development. The Journal needs to be completed in the 3 months leading up to the EPA. Ensure that all evidence for the Journal is gathered before this point.

Once all the above criteria have been met, the Employer will make their final approval and the EPA can begin!

The EPA for the Healthcare Assistant Apprenticeship is made up of three assessment activities:

  • Multiple-Choice and Short Answer Test;
  • Observation of Practice;
  • Reflective Journal and Interview.

Multiple Choice and Short Answer Test

A multiple choice test for the Healthcare Assistant Practitioner EPA

First up, Knowledge!

Your Apprentice will be required to complete a Multiple Choice and Short Answer Test. This component will test their Knowledge of the following criteria in the Apprenticeship Standard:

  • Principles and philosophy of health and social care;
  • Physiology, organisation and function of the human body;
  • Lifespan developments and healthcare needs from prenatal to end of life/bereavement;
  • Research and development in the health and social care sector to inform and improve quality of care;
  • Provision and promotion of holistic person centred care and support, duty of care and safeguarding of individuals;
  • Importance of the strategic environment in health and social care and the implications for the individual;
  • Importance of current evidence based practice within the scope of the role.

In this test, there will be 40 multiple-choice questions worth one mark each and four short answer questions (approx 250 words each) worth five marks each.

Below is the grading table for this assessment component:

Combined multiple choice and short answer score Grade
40-59% Pass
60-74% Merit
75% Distinction

TQUK uses online testing software that will allow your Apprentice to take their test on a computer. This software allows for digital invigilation and eliminates the need to book a place in a test centre.

Here are tips to help your Apprentice totally knock this assessment out of the park.

Top Tips

  • Book extra time to review knowledge criteria: Some Apprentices might struggle with knowledge components. Even if it’s just an hour or two, try to sit down with your Apprentice to make sure their knowledge is sufficient to pass the test.
  • Do a mock assessment: Mock assessments help your Apprentice get used to the assessment conditions and get a better sense of what questions will be asked of them. They’re also easy to set up and, with TQUK, free of charge. Give them a try!
  • Check to see if your Apprentice has difficulties with sit-down tests: Some Apprentices don’t do well with sit-down exams as it can make them nervous and apprehensive. Once you know, you can suggest some coping strategies to help them better perform during the test.
  • Review terminology: There are lots of terms specific to health and social care, and it’s easy to forget a definition here and there. Review the terminology of the sector to make sure your Apprentice understands them and is using them correctly.
  • Confirm the time and date: The EPA portion of the apprenticeship can be a stressful time. Make sure your Apprentice has the times and dates right.

Observation of Practice

Observation for Healthcare Assistant Practitioner EPA

Next up, Skills!

During this portion of the Healthcare Assistant Practitioner EPA, the End-Point Assessor will observe the Apprentice during their normal course of work in their workplace. The Observation should take a minimum of 90 minutes but can last several hours.

To pass the Observation of Practice, your Apprentice must be able to meet the following requirements:

  • Communicate complex, sensitive information through a variety of methods;
  • Manage information, keeping accurate records and ensuring confidentiality;
  • Use and promote a range of techniques to prevent the spread of infection including hand hygiene, the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and waste management;
  • Promote and maintain a safe and healthy working environment;
  • Identify and manage risks;
  • Demonstrate and promote what it means in practice to provide person centres care and support;
  • Treat people with dignity, respecting an individual’s diversity, beliefs, culture, values, needs, privacy and preferences;
  • Show respect and empathy for those you work with – have the courage to challenge areas of concern and work to best practice – be adaptable, reliable and consistent;
  • Show discretion and self-awareness;
  • Promote effective inter-professional and multi-disciplinary team working with peers, colleagues and staff from other agencies;
  • Provide appropriate leadership within the scope of the role;
  • Undertake defined clinical or therapeutic interventions appropriately delegated by a Registered Practitioner.

Here are some tips to help your Apprentice totally nail their Observation.

Top Tips

  • Take some extra time to review Skills criteria: Go through the Apprenticeship Standard with your Apprentice and identify, in detail, what each criterion may demand, and make sure your Apprentice can do it.
  • Do a mock assessment: Doing a mock assessment for an Observation would require you to come up with a structure and know what to look for. Get in touch with TQUK to get guidance on how to conduct a great mock Observation.
  • Relax: An Observation can be very stressful for an Apprentice. After all, the End-Point Assessor is reviewing their every move. Calming the Apprentice’s nerves will help them relax and allow them to do their best work.
  • Make sure the Apprentice knows where everything is: Your Apprentice may need to use particular items during their Observation, and they may struggle to remember where they are during the Observation. Make a checklist of important items they may need and have them double-check their location before the assessment.

Reflective Journal and Interview

Last up, the Reflective Journal and Interview!

Throughout the course of the apprenticeship, the Apprentice will complete a Reflective Journal where they will reflect on their development and the following components of the Apprenticeship Standard:

  • Case management: Manage own work and caseload and implements programmes of care in line with current evidence, taking action relative to an individual’s health and care needs.
  • Supervision and teaching: Allocates work to and supports the development of others and may supervise, teach, mentor and assess other staff as required.

The Journal must be 2,000 words (+/- 10%) and must include evidence of the Values and Behaviours being applied in the context of case management and supervision and teaching.

The Journal must be completed and submitted by the Apprentice in the three month period leading up to the EPA. It will then be reviewed by the End-Point Assessor and serve as a reference point for the Interview.

The Interview will be an opportunity for the Apprentice to further showcase their Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours. If the End-Point Assessor has any questions that arise from their review of the Journal, Observation or Multiple Choice and Short Answer Test, they will raise these issues during the Interview in order to clarify anything. The Interview will be a two-way dialogue.

The Reflective Journal and Interview are graded on a Pass, Merit, Distinction basis by the End-Point Assessor.

The following is a description of the grading criteria from the Apprenticeship Standard assessment plan:

Pass = Meets the Standard

The content of the Reflective Journal:

  • is organised and uses a recognised referencing system;
  • uses appropriate language and sentence construction but with some inaccuracies in grammar and spelling;
  • is able to relate some concepts and theories to practice;
  • makes satisfactory connections between learning and future practice;
  • does not go outside the word limit;
  • is able to engage in a professional discussion and is able to provide evidence that supports practice;
  • demonstrates the Knowledge, Skills and Behaviours set out in the Standard have been met.

Merit = Exceeds the Standard

The Reflective Journal content:

  • is well organised and uses recognised referencing systems;
  • uses appropriate language and sentence construction with accurate grammar and spelling;
  • is able to relate a range of concepts and theories to their practice;
  • makes good connections between learning and future practices;
  • does not go outside word limit;
  • is able to engage in and actively take forward a professional discussion and provides evidence that demonstrates a good level of analysis and synthesis across the range of theories and concepts applied to their practice.

Distinction = Far exceeds the Standard

The Reflective Journal content:

  • is highly structured and uses a recognised referencing system extensively;
  • uses appropriate language and sophisticated sentence construction with accurate grammar and spelling;
  • is able to relate a wide range of concepts and theories to their practice;
  • draws conclusions and makes insightful connections between learning and future practices;
  • does not go outside word limit;
  • is able to engage in a professional discussion in a way that demonstrates a very good exceptional knowledge of the concepts and theories they apply to their practice, including an awareness of the limitation of their knowledge and how this influences any analyses and interpretations based on that knowledge.

Top Tips

  • Encourage your Apprentice to start their Reflective Journal early: Some Apprentices have trouble expressing themselves well in writing. If your Apprentice has trouble with their writing, advise them that the earlier they start their Reflective Journal, the better. It will give them time to review and make changes over the course of their apprenticeship.
  • Reference the grading criteria: Advise your Apprentice to follow the grading criteria above for a Distinction when creating their Reflective Journal and encourage them to live up to those criteria. By following this guidance, they will be put in the best place to succeed.
  • Do a mock assessment: While you can’t do a mock assessment for the Journal, you can do one for the Interview. Submit a request to TQUK asking for mock assessment materials, including mock interview questions and assessment reports, so that your Apprentice is prepared for every eventuality.
  • Relax: Interviews can be stressful. Do you what you can to prepare your Apprentice and make them feel confident and comfortable before their assessment.
  • Time and date: Make double-sure your Apprentice has the right time and date for their Interview.

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With the guidance above, your Apprentice should have every chance to succeed during the Healthcare Assistant Practitioner EPA.

To keep up to date with all things EPA, return to our blog or follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

See you around The Hive!

 

Ever since TQUK EPA started offering End-Point Assessment for the Teaching Assistant Apprenticeship Standard, we’ve gotten a lot of questions from employers about how they can help their apprentices prepare for it.

It’s great to see employers so invested in their apprentices, so we wanted to do a bit more to help them out! If you have an apprentice about to take their End-Point Assessment, there’s a lot you can do to make sure they succeed.

Your Teaching Assistant

Even before your Teaching Assistant apprentice undertakes their End-Point Assessment, they already bring a ton of value to the classroom.  Teaching Assistant apprentices can work in primary, special and secondary education, across all age ranges. Their roles can include providing for special educational needs and emotional vulnerabilities. They are vital assets to have to make sure classes function for all students involved.

Throughout their apprenticeship they’ll attain vital knowledge, skills and behaviours needed to excel in their job, including understanding how pupils learn and develop, getting familiar with curriculums and knowing how to deliver them, developing strategies for learning and support, understanding how to promote professional standards and learning how to maintain professional relationships across your organisation. Throughout their programme they’ll complete their training, ace their work and pass Gateway.

Now, it’s time for the final test: the End-Point Assessment.

The End-Point Assessment for Teaching Assistant apprentices is made up of the following assessment activities:

  • Practical Observation with Question and Answers
  • Professional Discussion supported by Portfolio of Evidence

Practical Observation with Question and Answers

Teaching Assistant Grading

What is a Practical Observation?

In a Practical Observation, the End-Point Assessor will observe the apprentice undertaking a defined set of tasks related to their job role. The apprentice will be observed undertaking these activities while the End-Point Assessor notes and records performance and achievement against defined criteria outlined in the Apprenticeship Standard. Generally, Practical Observations assess skills and behaviours, but a well-designed Observation will assess knowledge, skills AND behaviours. An Observation also pairs well with a Professional Discussion to bring out the underpinning knowledge, so the End-Point Assessor can get a broad view of the apprentice’s competence by both observing them undertake tasks and asking them about these tasks (ie ‘I just saw you do it – now tell me why you did it’).

What Happens in the Assessment?

All details of the event (venue, date, time) will be planned by the employer, the apprentice and the End-Point Assessor before the assessment takes place (ideally during the Gateway stage).

The Practical Observation for the Teaching Assistant End-Point Assessment will take place on location and will be conducted by the End-Point Assessor. The Observation will last approximately 2 hours. The Question and Answer session will last for approximately 15 minutes after the end of the Observation.

The Observation will:

  • Reflect the apprentice’s genuine and typical working conditions;
  • Allow the apprentice to demonstrate all of the Apprenticeship Standard criteria;
  • Take a synoptic approach to assessing the knowledge, skills and behaviours (ie will assess how knowledge, skills and behaviours are connected and overlap);
  • Be carried out on a one-to-one basis (only one apprentice is allowed to be observed at a time).

During the Observation, the apprentice will demonstrate the ability to, among other things:

  • Deliver/lead small group teaching within clearly defined/planned parameters using initiative, sensitivity and understanding;
  • Implement current statutory guidance including ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education’ Part 1, safeguarding policies and the Prevent Strategy;
  • Use specific feedback to help pupils make progress;
  • Use relevant technology competently and effectively to improve learning;
  • Recognise the difference between pastoral and academic issues and model good behaviour for learning;
  • Contribute to a range of assessment processes and use information effectively – for example, written records;
  • Work closely with teachers to ensure their own contribution aligns with teaching.

Once the Observation is complete, the End-Point Assessor will conduct a Question and Answer session with the apprentice. This session will allow the End-Point Assessor to further question the apprentice in areas that they have partially demonstrated during the Observation in order to provide additional assurance.

Questions that the End-Point Assessor asks the apprentice will be written by the End-Point Assessment Organisation (EPAO). All EPAOs will keep a bank of test questions ready for the Question and Answer session, which is reviewed regularly to ensure unpredictability.

Top Tips: How to Help your Apprentice Prepare for their Practical Observation

  • Do a mock assessment: Conducting a mock observation with your apprentice will help prepare them for the assessment format and give them a sense of what kind of tasks they will perform. Get in touch with your EPAO for guidance on how to conduct a mock assessment.
  • Make sure the apprentice knows the time and date: The End-Point Assessment can be a very busy time. It’s easy for apprentices to fudge their schedules. Double-check that they know where to go and what to do.
  • Review specific topics and terminology: Check out the Apprenticeship Standard to ensure that your apprentice is meeting all the knowledge, skills and behaviours criteria that will be assessed during the Observation and the Question and Answer session.
  • Prepare for the Question and Answer session: It can be easy to assume that the Observation will only cover skills and behaviours, but the Question and Answer session will test the apprentice on various knowledge standards. Encourage your apprentice to review all the necessary criteria to be sure everything is up to snuff.
  • Prepare the premises so that the apprentice has everything they need to succeed: Ensure all the necessary equipment and materials are at hand and that there won’t be any unnecessary or avoidable disruptions during the assessment.
  • Speak with the Training Provider and/or On-Programme Assessor: You may be able to identify areas where the apprentice needs improvement.

Professional Discussion Supported by Portfolio of Evidence

Teaching Assistant Grading

What is a Professional Discussion?

A Professional Discussion is a structured discussion between the apprentice and the End-Point Assessor whereby the End-Point Assessor will ask the apprentice several pre-prepared, open-ended questions and the apprentice will provide responses. It is normally used in conjunction with an Observation or Project Assessment. It will allow the End-Point Assessor to probe deeper into the apprentice’s knowledge and to confirm any questions they had about their performance.

What is a Portfolio?

A Portfolio is a collection of evidence of work, progress and activity which the apprentice compiles over the course of their programme that may include testimonials, journal entries, projects and more. It will give the End-Point Assessor a detailed, tangible view of the apprentice’s abilities and accomplishments.

What Happens in the Assessment?

The Professional Discussion for the Teaching Assistant End-Point Assessment will last for approximately 90 minutes. It will be a structured discussion between the apprentice and the End-Point Assessor following the Practical Observation and will establish the apprentice’s understanding and application of the required knowledge, skills and behaviours. It will take place in a quiet room away from distractions.

The Portfolio of Evidence will serve as the basis for the Professional Discussion. The evidence within the Portfolio can be used by the apprentice to evidence and support their responses to the questions posed by the End-Point Assessor.

The purpose of the Professional Discussion is to:

  • Make judgements about the apprentice’s quality of work;
  • Explore aspects of the work, including how it was carried out, in more detail;
  • Discuss how the apprentice would behave in specific situations, with the End-Point Assessor asking scenario based questions;
  • Ensure there are no gaps within the evidence ;
  • Provide a basis for the End-Point Assessor to make a decision about the final grading.

The Portfolio is completed during the apprentice’s on-programme learning and is meant to support the Professional Discussion. It will contain a minimum of 10 pieces of evidence and a maximum of 15 which may include:

  • Feedback from a performance management review system;
  • Evidence of pupil progression;
  • Work produced by the apprentice (eg interventions);
  • Evidence from Practical Observations and general observations obtained over time;
  • Observations carried out by competent Teaching Assistants and HLTAs, Line Managers, Class Teachers and Mentors;
  • Assessor reviews;
  • Naturally occurring pieces of evidence (eg feedback from visitors/parents);
  • Details of any training and courses attended;
  • Notes from professional discussions.

Top Tips: How to Help Your Apprentice Prepare for their Professional Discussion

  • Make sure your apprentice hands their Portfolio in on time: The Portfolio of Evidence should be given to the End-Point Assessor two weeks before Professional Discussion takes place. Be sure to remind your apprentice of the assigned date.
  • Do a mock assessment: Lots of apprentices can get very intimidated by a Professional Discussion. A mock assessment will help prepare them for the format and the types of questions they will be asked. Contact your EPAO on how to conduct a suitable mock assessment.
  • Support your apprentice by helping them compile their Portfolio: The evidence your apprentice submits needs to be of sufficient quality, and the final Portfolio should not contain any gaps, particularly with regards to Safeguarding and Health and Safety.
  • Help your apprentice relax: It won’t do your apprentice any good to head into their assessment all stressed out. Provide them with some tips to get into the right headspace for their End-Point Assessment.

Grading for the Teaching Assistant End-Point Assessment

A Teaching Assistant apprentice EPA being graded

The final grade for the Teaching Assistant End-Point Assessment will be awarded based on the table below:

Practical Observation with Q&As Professional Discussion with Portfolio of Evidence EPA Grade
Fail Fail Fail
Pass Fail Fail
Fail Pass Fail
Distinction Fail Fail
Fail Distinction Fail
Pass Pass Pass
Distinction Pass Pass
Pass Distinction Pass
Distinction Distinction Distinction

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We hope this blog gave you a better picture of what’s involved in the Teaching Assistant End-Point Assessment. To keep up to date with all the latest End-Point Assessment news from TQUK, return to our blog or follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

See you around The Hive!

The Chef de Partie, also known as a Station Chef, is one of the hardest working members of the kitchen. They are responsible for running a specific section of the kitchen, such as the appetiser or the meat section. Without Chef de Parties, the careful division of labour in the kitchen would not be upheld, and restaurant service would fall apart. Depending on the size of the establishment, they may have several assistants or be the only worker in that department. A few examples of Chef de Partie titles can include:

  • The Butcher Chef, or the Boucher. They are in charge of preparing meats and poultry before they are delivered to their stations.
  • The Pantry Chef, or the Garde Manger. They are responsible for preparing cold dishes, such as salads and pâtés.
  • The Pastry Chef, or the Patissier. They are responsible for all baked goods–pastries and desserts abound!
  • The Vegetable Chef, or the Entremetier. They prepare items like vegetables, soups, starches and eggs.

Hiring an apprentice Chef de Partie is the perfect way to train up an individual to match your establishment’s needs so that they can fit seamlessly into your kitchen and provide much-needed help. Apprentices can also bring a wealth of benefits to your business such as an increase in productivity, a decrease in staff turnover and an influx of new ideas.

A Chef de Partie apprenticeship will typically last for 12-18 months, and apprentices will learn key skills such as:

  • How to produce a large range of dishes including meat, poultry, fish and vegetable dishes.
  • How to store ingredients and prepare dishes to deliver a quality product that is safe for the consumer.
  • How to handle multiple tasks and direct others as appropriate.
  • How to work collaboratively with their team and with colleagues in other parts of their organisation.

The End-Point Assessment

The End-Point Assessment for the Chef de Partie apprenticeship is comprised of four components including:

  • Two Hour On-Demand Multiple Choice Test
  • Four Hour Practical Observation
  • Culinary Challenge Project and Observation
  • 90-minute Professional Discussion

All assessment activities must be completed within two months at the end of the apprenticeship. The On-Demand Test, Practical Observation and Culinary Challenge can be undertaken in any order but the Professional Discussion must be the last activity completed.

Each component is given a Pass or Distinction grade. The apprentice’s final grade will be based on the combination of their overall performance in all the assessment activities. In order to pass, the apprentice must achieve 1 point for each of the four assessment components. Once the apprentice has achieved at least a pass in every assessment element, the final grade can be calculated as follows:

 

 

GRADING TABLE

 

Points for On-Demand Test + Professional Discussion

 

2

 

3

 

4

Points for Practical Observation + Culinary Challenge  

2

 

Pass

 

Pass

 

Pass

 

4

 

Pass

 

Pass

 

Pass

 

6

 

Pass

 

Distinction

 

Distinction

 

On-Demand Test

The two-hour on-demand test will be in multiple-choice format. The questions will be scenario based and will require the apprentice to show reasoning and joined up thinking. They must demonstrate that they can perform against key elements of the standard. The On-Demand Test will be on-screen and computer marked, and the assessment will take place in a ‘controlled’ environment away from the day to day pressures of work.

The questions will cover topics such as:

  • The principles of an effective team, including the roles and responsibilities of team members and how team dynamics can affect the success of the team
  • Customer preferences and customer profiling, including religious, medical and dietary requirements
  • Common categories of costs and their relative proportions in the food production industry
  • Principles of food waste control
  • Classical and modern techniques of food preparation, cooking and finishing
  • The importance of maintaining brand standards and business reputation

Practical Observation

The four-hour Practical Observation is an observation of the apprentice in the kitchen environment and must include customer interaction. During the observation, the apprentice should have the opportunity to demonstrate their competence in the preparation, cooking and service of dishes.

The Observation must:

  • Be conducted at a time which reflects typical working conditions and avoids seasonal periods of low levels of trading
  • Allow the apprentice to demonstrate all aspects of the standard being observed
  • Take a synoptic approach to observing their overall competence

The apprentice and employer must provide a two-week working schedule and must be planned in advance.

In the Practical Observation, the apprentice must show key competencies such as:

  • Ensure that all their actions are in line with the business standard and dish specification
  • Ensure that their activities comply with legal requirements, industry regulation, professional codes and organisational policies
  • Communicate effectively with their team, customers and other departments
  • Ensure the food and food production areas are prepared for service
  • Ensure that stock and resources are ready for service and address any shortages or issues with stock accordingly

Culinary Challenge Project and Observation

The three-hour Culinary Challenge and Observation will be an opportunity for the apprentice to display their precision and creativity. The Challenge requires the apprentice to design and cost a menu, which must comprise of three starters, three main courses and three desserts. The apprentice will submit this menu to the independent end assessor at least two weeks before the Observation, and the assessor will select the three dishes the apprentice must prepare in the assessment. On the day, the apprentice will produce a three-course meal from their menu for two people in three hours which will comprise of one starter, one main and one dessert. The apprentice will prepare a full recipe with a time plan before the assessment.

The menu design must adhere to certain standards outlined in the assessment plan such as:

  • It must be a three-course menu comprising of three starters, three main courses and three desserts
  • The menu should reflect current trends and should link to customer expectations, and, where appropriate, the organisation’s style
  • The apprentice must design the menu independently and should not incorporate any dishes from the organisation’s menu

In the Culinary Challenge Observation, the apprentice must follow certain guidelines such as:

  • They must prepare, cook and serve two portions of each course (starter, main course, dessert) within a three hour time window
  • Either their starter or main course must incorporate meat, fish or poultry, which must be prepared from ‘whole’ – e.g. from a whole duck, whole turbot or whole rabbit
  • Their main course must have at least two vegetable accompaniments appropriate to the dish

In order to pass the culinary challenge, the apprentice must demonstrate key competencies outlined in the standard such as:

  • Provide evidence of research into the menu and dish options appropriate to the situation
  • Produce a balanced menu with a range of dishes incorporating different skills and techniques for a range of foods
  • Produce costings for the dishes appropriate to the dish prices
  • Ensure their activities comply with legal requirements, industry regulation, professional codes and organisational policies
  • Produce dishes on time in line with menu specifications

Professional Discussion

Before the Professional Discussion, the apprentice must write a log of complex dishes which will be reviewed in the Discussion. This log is the apprentice’s opportunity to present a variety of complex dishes they have prepared with full recipes, time plans, food safety controls and photos. The log should reflect the dishes produced and should not record the individual stages of preparation. (For example, a cheese soufflé would be an appropriate inclusion but grating cheese would not.) The log can contain dishes prepared at any stage during the apprentice’s learning and development period as long as they are complex enough. The complexity of these dishes may manifest itself in any of the following:

  • The raw ingredient and the preparation methods required, for example, advanced butchery
  • The number or combination of preparation, cooking and finishing methods
  • The combination of flavours, tastes and ingredients
  • The preparation and care taken to avoid errors with technical processes
  • The precision with which preparation, cooking and service is executed
  • The tools and equipment required to produce the dish to the required standard

The 90 minute Professional Discussion is a structured discussion between the apprentice and their independent end assessor. This Discussion will require 30 minutes to be used for review of the log of complex dishes and costings for the Culinary Challenge. The Discussion will be planned in advance to allow the apprentice to prepare fully so that they can demonstrate their competence and application against multiple areas of the standard, such as dish evaluation.

The Professional Discussion will be conducted in a ‘controlled environment’ i.e. in a quiet room away from the apprentice’s normal place of work. The assessor should recognise areas which have already been covered in the Observation and Culinary Challenge so that they don’t re-assess the apprentice in an area which they’ve already demonstrated competence in.

In order to pass the Professional Discussion, the apprentice must demonstrate competencies outlined in the standard such as:

  • Explain why it is essential to instil the importance of company vision, values, empowerment and following procedures to staff
  • Provide an overview of how the food production operation meets the needs of the business and customer
  • Explain the importance of keeping up to date with current industry trends and provide examples of how this has been achieved
  • Provide evidence to show they have been part of effective planning and review in the team

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We hope this gave you some more insight into the EPA for Chef de Partie apprentices. After the completion of their apprenticeship, apprentices can progress into a senior culinary chef role and will be fully ready to help your organisation thrive!

To keep up to date with all the latest news from TQUK EPA, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

See you around The Hive!

Our EPA team is constantly working hard to add to the list of apprenticeship standards we deliver End-Point Assessment for. As a result, we’re in the works to deliver EPA for five more standards in the very near future!

Here’s a sneak peek of all the standards to come:

Teaching Assistant

Teaching Assistants can work with students across all ages in Primary, Special and Secondary education, including those who have special educational needs or emotional vulnerabilities. Their primary role is to support their class teacher and enhance their pupils’ learning by ensuring that they understand the work set, know their learning objectives and stay on task in order to make sufficient progress.

In this apprenticeship, apprentices will learn key skills such as how to support their pupils towards independent learning, how to implement effective behavior management strategies and how to work closely with teachers to ensure that their own contributions align with the teaching objectives.

The End-Point Assessment components for the Teaching Assistant Apprenticeship include:

  • Practical Observation with a Question & Answer session
  • Professional Discussion with a Portfolio of Evidence included

Successful apprentices can progress into a number of career paths in the Educational sector such as Higher Level Teaching Assistant, Assistant Teacher and Teacher.

IT Technical Salesperson

An IT Technical Salesperson specialises in selling the technical products and services of a company, such as data storage and cloud services. They must maintain good relationships with existing clients and approach potential customers with the aim of winning new business. They should also maintain a good understanding of existing and new technologies that are emerging.

In this apprenticeship, apprentices will gain knowledge of the basic elements of computer systems, learn how to negotiate and close sales and acquire a thorough understanding of the business products they are selling.

The End-Point Assessment components for the IT Technical Salesperson Apprenticeship include:

  • Summative Portfolio
  • Synoptic Project
  • Employer Reference
  • Interview

Those who are successful in completing their apprenticeship are eligible to apply for registration onto the Register of IT Technicians.

Associate Project Manager

Associate Project Managers help manage business projects by using their resources and management skills. They will know what needs to be achieved, how it will be achieved, how long it will take, how much it will cost and will work with the project team to achieve the required outcomes.

In this apprenticeship, apprentices will learn valuable skills such as how to develop project budgets, how to prepare and maintain project schedules and how to respond to any project issues.

The End-Point Assessment components for the Associate Project Manager apprenticeship include:

  • Presentation supported by a Portfolio of Evidence
  • Professional Discussion supported by the same Portfolio of Evidence

On starting the apprenticeship, apprentices can become student members of the Association for Project Management (APM). After they complete their apprenticeship successfully, they can then become eligible for associate membership. Full membership can later be attained through further experience and professional development.

Learning and Development Practitioner

Learning and Development (L&D) Practitioners are responsible for identifying learning and training needs within a business and designing training programmes to improve their organisation.

In this apprenticeship, apprentices will learn valuable skills such as how to identify and analyse learning needs, how to design training resources to meet these needs and how to monitor a learner’s progress to deliver motivational and developmental feedback.

The End-Point Assessment components for the L&D Practitioner Apprenticeship include:

  • Work Based Project and Professional Discussion
  • Presentation based on a Learning Journal

Apprentices who successfully complete their apprenticeship are eligible to apply for Associate membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) or any other professional body that recognizes this apprenticeship within its membership criteria.

Learning and Development Consultant / Business Partner

Learning and Development (L&D) Consultants are responsible for identifying areas of improvement in individuals, groups and organisations and finding appropriate learning and development solutions to improve their organisation. L&D Consultants must also measure the outcomes and return on investment of any learning interventions they implement. This role can exist in a range of organisations that span across the private, public and third sector.

In the apprenticeship, apprentices will learn a range of valuable skills including how to identify organisational skills gaps and risks, how to present a range of innovative solutions to fill these gaps and how to construct and manage an L&D project.

The End-Point Assessment components for the L&D Consultant Apprenticeship include:

  • Work Based Project with Professional Discussion
  • Presentation and Q&A based on a Learning Journal

Just as with the L&D Practitioner, apprentices who successfully complete their programme are eligible to apply for Associate membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) or any other professional body that recognizes this apprenticeship within its membership criteria.

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We hope you enjoyed that little taste of the new standards to come! If you’d like to see the existing range of apprenticeship standards we provide EPA for, click here.

To keep up to date with the latest news from TQUK EPA, return to our blog or follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

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Hiring an apprentice brings a large range of benefits to your business while helping out the hundreds of thousands of people around the UK who are looking for work. Apprenticeships are designed to train individuals with little or no experience in a role into workers who have all the skills needed to excel in their job. As an employer, the time you spend investing in your apprentices will help them become excellent employees dedicated to improving your business.

Here are five fantastic reasons why you should hire an apprentice:

1. You Increase Your Productivity

Hiring an apprentice is a fantastic way for your business to grow its talent and develop a motivated and highly skilled workforce. Because apprentices earn while they learn, they’ll be trained in the latest industry knowledge while developing vital skills that’ll benefit your business, all the while receiving a wage.

An apprentice can also increase your company’s productivity! According to research conducted by the National Apprenticeship Service, employers who had an established apprenticeship programme reported that productivity in their workplace had improved by 76%, while 75% reported that hiring apprentices improved the quality of their product or service.

2. You Decrease Staff Turnover

Hiring an apprentice means training and nurturing them throughout their entire programme. Investing time and energy in apprentices like this can really secure their loyalty to your company and help decrease your staff turnover.

For example, Whitbread, the UK’s largest hotel, restaurant and coffee shop operator, focused on improving staff retention in their apprenticeship programme, as it was a business challenge for the organisation. Their findings were great: for entry level, back-office roles, turnover rates were 55%, while on the apprenticeship level this was reduced to 40%. Furthermore, when calculating retention rates, nearly three-quarters of their apprentices stayed with the company for more than 12 months, whereas only a quarter of non-apprentices did.

As a result of these numerous apprenticeship benefits, the company has set an ambitious target to recruit 1,500 more apprentices into the business over the next two years.

3. You Benefit From Fresh Thinking

Apprentices can bring new ideas into your organisation and develop many more as they gain experience in their role.

CBI Magazine asked a variety of businesses why they hired apprentices. Tricia Vincent, Training and Competency Manager at Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy, said that “Inquisitive and curious minds enable us as a business to progress, develop and innovate. Our apprentices complete some quite complex projects that push not only their newly acquired engineering skills, but also encourage their ability to problem solve. We empower them to make suggestions on improvements and present their ideas.”

At the Manchester Airport, Press Office Manager Seb Thompson also talked about the benefits he received from having a social media apprentice: “It has made a real difference and brought a new perspective that you don’t get through the normal recruitment process. They are totally immersed in the digital world. And as they learn and develop with their qualification we have seen them bring in a wealth of innovative ideas and trends so the whole team actually ends up learning something new.”

4. You Contribute To Your Community

Hiring apprentices ensures that your business gives back to the local community by helping combat youth unemployment in your area. By doing this, you’ll help create a skilled workforce that’ll drive your company forward and enhance your organisation’s image in the process.

According to research conducted by the Centre for Business and Economics Research in 2015, offering apprenticeships was perceived by two-thirds of the public as contributing to society and providing opportunities for young people. As a result, five million consumers are more likely to buy from an apprentice employer and one in four consumers would even pay more for goods and services from companies that employ apprentices.

5. You Use Your Apprenticeship Levy Contribution

If your business has a payroll of £3 million or more, then you must pay the apprenticeship levy whether you employ an apprentice or not. This levy is charged at a rate of 0.5% of your company’s pay bill, and as an employer, you’ll be given 18 months to spend each payment.

So why not use it? By hiring apprentices, you can ensure that your levy doesn’t go to waste and spend that money on attracting great young talent and developing your staff to benefit your business in the long run.

A win-win all around!

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And there you have it — five great reasons why your company should hire an apprentice! If you’d like to see the range of standards we provide End-Point Assessment for, click here. Otherwise, to keep up to date with the latest news from TQUK EPA, return to our blog or follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

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TQUK EPA was the first End-Point Assessment Organisation to pass apprentices on three new standards, including the Adult Care Worker, Commis Chef and Hospitality Team Member standards.

Now, we’ve done it a fourth time.

In partnership with Creative Support, TQUK EPA is proud to announce that we’ve passed the first apprentice on the Lead Adult Care Worker Standard!

Lee Wild became the first apprentice to be passed on the Lead Adult Care Worker standard on the 1st August 2018. She received a Merit overall for her hard work, and both TQUK and Creative Support are delighted with the results.

TQUK EPA and Creative Support have worked together to pass apprentices in a variety of standards. We passed the very first apprentice, Sona Peskin, and the first apprentice in the UK to receive a Distinction, Joseph Bailey, on the Adult Care Worker standard.

The Lead Adult Care Worker standard is the next level up from the Adult Care Worker standard. Lead Adult Care Workers help care for adults with support needs so that they can achieve their personal goals and live as independently as possible. They are also expected to provide frontline leadership and guidance to other care workers.

Committed and Hard-Working

Everyone working with Lee was impressed with the hard work and commitment she displayed throughout the programme.

Her On Programme Assessor, Miltos Baralos, said:

It was clear throughout her apprenticeship that Lee had the experience and knowledge needed to carry out her duties. We worked together—she showed interest in developing her knowledge and I supported her to achieve this. We had effective communication and regular contact. During the face to face meetings, we had Professional Discussions on different subjects for her qualification and Lee found this very helpful.

After she completed her mock Multiple Choice Test, I contacted Lee and we went through her results together. I also discussed with her, in more detail, the components she would need to be aware of during her Professional Discussion, which was the concluding assessment element to her End-Point Assessment.

Before Lee’s EPA meeting with her End-Point Assessor, I was contacted by TQUK to discuss the assessment arrangements. It was good for me to be contacted by the End-Point Assessor and the EPA Coordinator, as it felt very personal and helpful. I was happy with the approach given by TQUK, as they gave prompt feedback on the apprentice’s assessment outcomes, which was very important.”

Janet Glentworth, the Vocational Centre Manager for Creative Support, had this to say:

Creative Support are proud to train the first Lead Adult Care Worker apprentice. It was tough at times, as the standard was new to us all, but Lee and her assessor were willing to take the challenge on board, and this has resulted in Lee achieving a Merit. Lee and her assessor also commented on how much the apprenticeship training helped her develop a more rounded approach as a learner than only undertaking a diploma in Health and Social Care.

Receiving the End-Point Assessment through TQUK has also affirmed that Lee has met the national standard through their rigorous assessment. This has resulted in Creative Support achieving another first with TQUK.”

Kelle McQuade, Head of EPAO at TQUK, also chimed in with her thoughts:

We’re very excited that we’ve completed Lee as the first Lead Adult Care Worker Apprentice in the UK. Having now been the first EPAO to complete apprentices on four new standards, we’re really starting to flourish as an EPAO. Our organisation grows every day and we consistently keep adding new standards to our EPA offerings.

“We’ve worked with Creative Support in the past and have always been really pleased with the care and support they’ve provided their apprentices. This case has been no different—Creative Support have provided Lee with fantastic help from the very beginning and everyone involved in her programme, Miltos included, should be really proud of her achievement.

“I’d like to extend my congratulations to Lee and all the staff at Creative Support who’ve helped her on her journey. You should all be proud of yourselves! Here’s to TQUK and Creative Support achieving more firsts in the future!”

If you’d like to see the other apprenticeship standards we deliver End-Point Assessments for, then click here. To keep up to date with the latest news from TQUK EPA, return to our blog or follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

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Levi is our new Exams Officer who joined TQUK back in mid-July. She previously worked in the marking department at AQA, but years before that she completed a hairdressing apprenticeship on the old frameworks system.

So we thought we’d sit down with her to talk more about her experience and how it compares to the new End-Point Assessment system.

Here are the results!

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What apprenticeship did you take?

I completed an NVQ Level 2 Diploma in Hairdressing six years ago, in 2012.

What was your experience like during the apprenticeship?

It was really useful. I learned a lot of practical skills and knowledge vital for the hairdressing industry. For the majority of the 12-month apprenticeship, I’d work 5 days a week at a salon. Then, once every fortnight, I’d go to my college to study theory and do more training. I completed another hairdressing course prior to this, but the apprenticeship really honed all my hairdressing skills so by the end of it I was confident in colouring, cutting and styling hair, and also dealing with clients.

Did you feel like you were properly prepared for working in that sector?

Yes definitely! The invaluable thing about apprenticeships is that you’re employed and working while you train. This means that you’ve already learned all the skills you need for your job, so you know exactly what to do once you’re qualified. Also, if you’ve done well in your programme, your employer is likely to offer you a job at the end of it! So there’s a good chance you’ll secure a job after your training, which is different to pursuing a degree in higher education where you have to find a job after you’ve graduated.

Once you receive your qualification, you also have other options. My employer offered me a job at the end of my apprenticeship, but I chose to become a freelance hairdresser instead. I also knew people who became self-employed and rented a chair in a salon to use with their own clients.

What do you think of apprenticeships as a form of education?

I think apprenticeships suit people differently depending on their learning style. If you prefer to learn practically like I do, with only a little classroom studying involved, then apprenticeships are perfect. But if you want to go down a more academic route, then pursuing higher education is a better option.

I think apprenticeships have been stigmatised a lot in the past. They weren’t viewed as an equal form of education to programmes in higher education, such as A levels or Bachelor degrees. It’s quite unfair because thinking of higher education as a more ‘valid’ form of education doesn’t take into account that people learn differently.

However, I think the view around apprenticeships is changing. There’s now more people who view further education and higher education on an equal level. I think a large part of that is because there’s a much larger range of apprenticeships available now than there were before. There are still apprenticeships in sectors such as hairdressing and hospitality, but now you’ve got apprenticeships in business, science and engineering. That means that, if someone wants to go into business, they can choose between university or an apprenticeship depending on which they’d enjoy more, which is great!

How were you assessed on the Frameworks system?

I was assessed continually throughout my programme. I had different units that focused on different aspects of hairdressing, such as styling hair, basic cutting techniques and washing hair. I’d be trained in these units, then at the end I was assessed with a short online or paper test. I also needed to compile a portfolio for each unit I completed and submit it at the end of the apprenticeship.

What do you think of the new End-Point Assessment compared to the Frameworks style of continual assessment?

I think continual assessment has its strengths, as it helped my employer and training provider see that I had the correct hairdressing skills and knowledge from one month to the next. But I think the End-Point Assessment is a better way to assess an apprentice’s skills. First of all, employers effectively write the standard. Major employers in each industry are brought together to form groups called trailblazers. These trailblazers outline all the knowledge, skills and behaviours which are required and assessed within the EPA. This means that apprentices are learning the exact skills and knowledge needed to be fully competent in their jobs. It also means that there’s less disconnect between employers and training providers, as employers are more involved in writing the apprenticeship standard. They now know that apprentices are learning everything they’re meant to at their training providers.

I also think that having a major assessment at the end allows apprentices to purely focus on learning and training for the length of their programme. Instead of having to worry about constant assessments, they can now spend their time learning the necessary skills and knowledge for their role. I also think having the assessments at the end encourages apprentices to spend significant time preparing for their EPA, which will help them achieve a higher mark.

I’ve got a friend who recently completed her End-Point Assessment on the new standard. She said that she was nervous at first, but ultimately went into it confidently, and saw it as a chance to show her assessor everything she had learned. I think the EPA should give apprentices a sense of validation in this regard. If you prepare and work hard, just like my friend, you should come away thinking “oh, I’ve actually learned quite a bit!” and feel proud of themselves.

Thank you very much for your time!

No worries!

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We hope you enjoyed the interview! If you’re interested in learning more about the End-Point Assessments we provide, you can find them all here. To keep up to date with the latest news from TQUK EPA, return to our blog or follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

See you around The Hive!

It’s Filet Mignon Day, ladies and gentlemen!

Mhh, a whole day dedicated to this delicious cut of beef. Who could ask for more?

In assessing Commis Chef Apprentices, we see the care and dedication that goes into serving the finer cuts of meat like filet mignon. Commis chefs tend to be the most common starting position in many kitchens. They carry out basic tasks under the eye of a senior chef, and throughout their apprenticeship they’ll have all sorts of interactions with beef—identifying which cuts to use, prepping and seasoning the meat, storing different cuts in the appropriate manner and using correct knife skills to prepare the food.

So we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to give them some help! Here’s our quick guide to a few of the most popular cuts of beef: where they come from and how you might want to cook them for delicious results!

The Magnificent Cow

Diagram of cow.

First, we start with the cow itself. Just as End-Point Assessments are made up of different components—judgement tests, culinary challenges and practical observations abound—so are cows made up of different parts. The diagram above is for your reference (we’re looking at you, apprentices!), as we’ll be talking about where the following cuts come from in the animal.

Filet Mignon

Filet Mignon.
Photography by Robspinella, distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

We begin, of course, with filet mignon. This piece of meat is a smaller cut of the fillet, which is taken from the tenderloin, also known as the short loin. This muscle is one of the least active on the cow, which makes its meat incredibly tender. The fillet is regarded as the king of all steaks, which explains why it comes with such a high price tag! If you can afford to dine on a filet mignon, then you’re clearly doing something right!

Apprentice cooking tip: A filet mignon should be cooked over an incredibly high heat as quickly as possible to avoid the meat drying out.

Brisket

Beef brisket roast.

The brisket comes from the chest area between the shoulders of a cow, which means that it does a lot of work in its lifetime. This cut has high amounts of fat and connective tissue, which adds a lot of flavor to the meat. The brisket is usually sold boned and rolled as a full joint, and needs to be slow-cooked to render all of its fat and connective tissue down.

Apprentice cooking tip: A brisket is traditionally slow-roasted in the oven until the meat falls apart and becomes beautifully tender, like the picture above. It can also be used in pit smoking, a popular American technique that creates smoked, barbequed briskets.

Sirloin

Sirloin Steak meal.

The sirloin is located just above the tenderloin, at the top of the loin in the diagram, and has a good balance of fat and tenderness. Sirloins are typically sold boned and rolled, ready for roasting whole, but are also cut and sold as steaks.

Apprentice cooking tip: The customer is always right, and they’ll have their own preference for how their sirloin steak is cooked. For your own reference, we suggest cooking this steak to at least a medium, as this gives the fat time to render down so it can cook in its own juices. Mhh.

Chuck Steak

Chuck steak stew.

Chuck comes from the area around the shoulders, which is a hard-working part of the cow. This means that chuck can turn out quite tough if it isn’t cooked correctly, but it also makes it one of the most economical cuts of beef out there.

Apprentice cooking tip: Chuck has a good amount of fat and tissue that needs to be broken down. This means that chuck is best used in stews, casseroles or pies, all of which are cooked for over an hour.

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We hope this guide helps all the Commis Chef Apprentices out there with your knowledge! If you’d like more help with your apprenticeship, then you can download our factsheet that’ll give you an overview of your programme, along with some very valuable tips for your End-Point Assessment.

If you’re an employer looking for an End-Point Assessment organisation, then find out more about the Commis Chef standard here.

To keep up to date with the latest news from TQUK EPA, return to our blog or follow us on TwitterFacebook and Instagram.

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The Importance of HR

Every company has their employees, and HR professionals play an integral role in managing workers and upholding workplace culture. HR employees are responsible for a large range of tasks including recruiting new hires, maintaining benefits and payroll, mediating conflict and managing training and development. Effective HR management can create an inclusive and healthy working environment, and happy employees can lead to higher productivity and an increase in worker retention.

57% of businesses who invest in apprentices report that a high proportion later go into management positions within the same company. This means that apprentices are likely to remain working for the company they completed their programme with, saving them on training costs and valuable time recruiting an outside hire.

The HR Support Apprenticeship

Shaking hands.

Hiring an HR Support Apprentice will provide support to the HR department of any business, and will also teach the apprentice valuable skills relating to their HR role. HR Support Apprentices will help your business by:

  • Handling day to day queries from employees and providing HR advice;
  • Working on a range of HR processes such as recruitment, hiring, training, performance management and employee retention;
  • Keeping employee records using HR systems;
  • Providing relevant HR information to the business;
  • Providing advice to managers on a large range of HR issues in regards to company policy and current law, and giving guidance to prevent employment tribunals or legal risk to the business.

An HR Support apprenticeship will typically last for 18 – 24 months. Apprentices will develop vital skills through:

  • Delivering excellent customer service on a range of HR queries;
  • Developing communication and interpersonal skills through dealing with customers and colleagues;
  • Building strong work relationships and developing teamwork skills;
  • Developing problem-solving skills through actively listening and understanding the root causes of any problems before providing HR solutions.

The End-Point Assessment

Writing in a notebook.

The End-Point Assessment for an HR Support apprenticeship includes two components which are equally-weighted. These components are:

  • The Consultative Project
  • The Professional Discussion

The apprentice must pass each component in order to pass the apprenticeship. Here’s a table with further information about the weighting and pass marks:

Assessment Method
Weighting
Pass Mark
Distinction Mark
Consultative Project

50%

60-84 marks

85-100 marks

Professional Discussion 50% 60-84 marks

85-100 marks

The Consultative Project

Typing computer.

The Consultative Project is a 3000-word document that outlines how the apprentice has applied their knowledge and HR related skills on the job. The Project should describe a situation where the apprentice has successfully worked with a customer to deliver a specific piece(s) of HR advice or provide an HR solution(s) for them.

The content of this document should include:

  • The project objectives;
  • The scope of the work;
  • A description of the situation/problem/business need;
  • The methodology used;
  • The information gathered;
  • Any conclusions and recommendations;
  • Details of the implementation plan.

Examples of the Project might be:

  • Providing guidance to a manager or a team on a range of HR matters, including recruitment, retirement and more;
  • Taking a defined role in a larger project run by more senior members of the HR team;
  • Carrying out analysis of HR information and producing recommendations for action.

The Professional Discussion

Meeting at a table.

The Professional Discussion is conducted after the TQUK End-Point Assessor has reviewed and marked the Consultative Project. It focuses on testing the skills and behaviours outlined in the Standard, along with any knowledge and skills components that weren’t covered in the Consultative Project.

To ensure consistency, TQUK EPA will provide a bank of standard questions that the TQUK End-Point Assessor will use in the Professional Discussion. There will be 13-16 questions asked during the Discussion, each of which will focus on a single component of the knowledge, skills or behaviours listed in Appendix 1 of the End-Point Assessment plan. The Professional Discussion should last between 60 – 75 minutes.

After the Apprenticeship

Business man in a suit.

Once the apprentice has completed their apprenticeship, they can choose to develop into more advanced roles such as:

  • HR Consultant/Partner;
  • HR Manager;
  • Employee Relations Manager;
  • Training and Development Manager.

We hope this blog gave you some more insight into the HR Support Apprenticeship! TQUK EPA is dedicated to delivering quality assessments at a competitive price to ensure that employers receive confident, skilled workers at the end of their apprenticeship. When you work with TQUK EPA, everyone wins!

To keep up to date with the latest apprenticeships and end-point assessment news, return to TQUK EPA’s blog or follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

See you around the Hive!

Joseph Bailey was delighted to complete his Adult Care Worker apprenticeship in mid June at Creative Support. But on top of this achievement, he received another feather in his cap: Joseph was the first Adult Care Worker apprentice in the UK to receive a Distinction.

Joseph’s achievement is unique and impressive since he is one of a small minority of male apprentices in the care sector.

Both Creative Support and Training Qualifications UK were amazed with Joseph’s drive, expertise and confidence.

Continue reading “TQUK passes the first adult care worker apprentice in the UK to receive a Distinction”

How TQUK Can Help You

The new apprenticeship standards are designed to improve upon what’s gone before and help with the apprentice’s initial journey into their chosen career, before you know it, they’ll be on the road to success.

Bee

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